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Richard Brookes
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ARSENIC LAKE WHEAL FANNY DEVON

Autumnal trees and overhanging branches frame and reflect on the serenely beautiful but potentially deadly lake at Wheal Fanny. According to various web sources Wheal Fanny was one of the Victorian copper and arsenic mines of the Devon Great Consols Mining Group (DGC) in the Tamar Valley on the border with Cornwall, SW England, UK. The pond or reservoir was used to store water to assist with the mines ore extraction and with processing on the dressing floors and other processes. Water was channelled using a series of leats and fed waterwheels using flat rods to power machinery. Wheal Fanny was named after the daughter of the engineer, John Hitchin, who persuaded the Duke Of Bedford, the landowner, to mine his land. DGC was once the largest copper producer in the world and subsequently became the largest arsenic producer in the world. Although being reclaimed by nature the surrounding land and lake has been contaminated with the mines tailings, waste materials and run-off from the workings and huge spoil heaps. Due to the importance of this site in the development of pioneering mining skills and technology which were exported around the whole world, the site is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Mining Landscape of Cornwall and West Devon no 1215.

Image dimensions: 4000 x 3000 pixels

ARSENIC LAKE WH...

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ARSENIC LAKE WHEAL FANNY DEVON

Autumnal trees and overhanging branches frame and reflect on the serenely beautiful but potentially deadly lake at Wheal Fanny. According to various web sources Wheal Fanny was one of the Victorian copper and arsenic mines of the Devon Great Consols Mining Group (DGC) in the Tamar Valley on the border with Cornwall, SW England, UK. The pond or reservoir was used to store water to assist with the mines ore extraction and with processing on the dressing floors and other processes. Water was channelled using a series of leats and fed waterwheels using flat rods to power machinery. Wheal Fanny was named after the daughter of the engineer, John Hitchin, who persuaded the Duke Of Bedford, the landowner, to mine his land. DGC was once the largest copper producer in the world and subsequently became the largest arsenic producer in the world. Although being reclaimed by nature the surrounding land and lake has been contaminated with the mines tailings, waste materials and run-off from the workings and huge spoil heaps. Due to the importance of this site in the development of pioneering mining skills and technology which were exported around the whole world, the site is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Mining Landscape of Cornwall and West Devon no 1215.

Image dimensions: 4000 x 3000 pixels