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Richard Brookes
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THE PIPERS STANDING STONES BODMIN MOOR CORNWALL

Ancient standing stones, The Pipers, stand sentinel like on the remote and waterlogged wilderness of Bodmin Moor. These intriguing menhirs are close to the Hurlers central stone circle near Minions, Cornwall, SW England, UK. The precise use or meaning of the stones has been lost over the ages. Perhaps the monuments were used for ceremonial, ritual or religious purposes or as markers or entrances with special alignments. It is believed that they date back to 1500 BC during the Bronze age perhaps earlier from the Neolithic or Stone Age periods. Local legends say the stones represent musicians who were turned to stone with the hurler players for indulging in festivities on a religious day. The 2m high granite stones or megaliths frame distant Stowe Hill. The hill has evidence of ancient habitation and the amazing Cheesewring, a prominent weathered granite natural rock formation. Stowe Hill is dominated by Stowe's Pound, a huge tor enclosure comprising two massive stone-walls. The smaller enclosure surrounds the tors at the southern end of the hill; the larger one encircles the rest of the ridge. Inside Stowe's Pound are two Bronze Age cairns, a stone round house and over 100 house platforms. The site is thought to be Neolithic or Bronze Age and connected with other settlements and ritual monuments in the vicinity. A gold cup, bronze dagger and grave goods were found at nearby Rillaton Barrow, a round burial barrow, during a 1837 excavation. A legend associated with the cup is that Rillaton is haunted by the spirit of a druid priest, who offers travellers a drink from an undrainable cup. One night a traveller threw the cup's contents at the ghost, and was later found dead in a ravine Photo taken early one cold frosty Autumn morning during golden hour.

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THE PIPERS STAN...

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THE PIPERS STANDING STONES BODMIN MOOR CORNWALL

Ancient standing stones, The Pipers, stand sentinel like on the remote and waterlogged wilderness of Bodmin Moor. These intriguing menhirs are close to the Hurlers central stone circle near Minions, Cornwall, SW England, UK. The precise use or meaning of the stones has been lost over the ages. Perhaps the monuments were used for ceremonial, ritual or religious purposes or as markers or entrances with special alignments. It is believed that they date back to 1500 BC during the Bronze age perhaps earlier from the Neolithic or Stone Age periods. Local legends say the stones represent musicians who were turned to stone with the hurler players for indulging in festivities on a religious day. The 2m high granite stones or megaliths frame distant Stowe Hill. The hill has evidence of ancient habitation and the amazing Cheesewring, a prominent weathered granite natural rock formation. Stowe Hill is dominated by Stowe's Pound, a huge tor enclosure comprising two massive stone-walls. The smaller enclosure surrounds the tors at the southern end of the hill; the larger one encircles the rest of the ridge. Inside Stowe's Pound are two Bronze Age cairns, a stone round house and over 100 house platforms. The site is thought to be Neolithic or Bronze Age and connected with other settlements and ritual monuments in the vicinity. A gold cup, bronze dagger and grave goods were found at nearby Rillaton Barrow, a round burial barrow, during a 1837 excavation. A legend associated with the cup is that Rillaton is haunted by the spirit of a druid priest, who offers travellers a drink from an undrainable cup. One night a traveller threw the cup's contents at the ghost, and was later found dead in a ravine Photo taken early one cold frosty Autumn morning during golden hour.

Image dimensions: 4000 x 3000 pixels