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Richard Brookes
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SOUTH CARADON MINE RUINS BODMIN MOOR CORNWALL

Abandoned Victorian copper mining activities dominate the spectacular landscape on the flanks of Caradon Hill above the River Seaton Valley high on a remote part of Bodmin Moor, St Cleer, Cornwall, SW England, UK. According to web sources, tin oxide deposits (alluvial cassiterite) originally drew medieval miners to the area and eventually the tin streaming mine of Gonamena was established just upstream to the left of this shot. The extensive South Caradon mine shown, one of many in the area, was established by Captain James Clymo and his sons and the Kittow family after copper was discovered in 1834 from an adit driven into the hillside at Sump shaft. This became the deepest shaft of the mine sett at 250 fathoms (1,500 feet or 457m). The mine ran until the 1890s and produced some 218,000 tons of copper ore making it the 6th largest copper mine in Cornwall. Holman's Shaft pumping engine house can be seen on the skyline to the left adjacent to Rule's shaft engine houses ruins and chimney stacks. To the middle right is Jope's Shaft ivy clad pumping engine house and chimney (with lower boiler house in front) all above the massive waste material spoil heaps. It is thought that Jope's engine house housed one of the few Sims compound engines built in Cornwall. This shaft is also historically important as the site of the last 'man engine' to be built. In the foreground is the ore processing and dressing area. The ruined stamps engine house stack survives although the engine house is now rubble. It housed a steam engine of 28 inch diameter which powered a set of 24 headed stamps on the Southern side of the flywheel and a rotative crusher to the North). Cobbled dressing floors are also in the foreground. Ruins of the miner's dry and other ancillary buildings, leats, reservoirs and horse whim remains are also present. Some remains are buried beneath the massive spoil heaps from later workings. The northern ‘Main’ lode is marked by the ruins of Sump Shaft, Pearce’s Shaft, and Engine Shaft, which trace it up the steep hillside. The southern lode comprised lodes along the southern flank of the hill: Clymo’s, Jope’s, Kitford’s, Holman’s (all directors of the company) and Caunter Lode (a lode running at an offset angle to main lode). These are marked by ruins at Jope’s Shaft, Holman’s (where the archway over the tramline remains) and Kitto’s in the far east of the sett. The mines were serviced by the long dismantled Liskeard & Caradon Railway. This view was taken from a branch line of the old railway near the West Caradon Mine one October. The old granite setts (blocks) to hold the rails can still be seen in situ. Due to the importance of this site in the development of pioneering mining skills and technology which were exported around the whole world, the site is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Mining Landscape of Cornwall and West Devon no 1215.

Image dimensions: 4000 x 3000 pixels

SOUTH CARADON M...

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SOUTH CARADON MINE RUINS BODMIN MOOR CORNWALL

Abandoned Victorian copper mining activities dominate the spectacular landscape on the flanks of Caradon Hill above the River Seaton Valley high on a remote part of Bodmin Moor, St Cleer, Cornwall, SW England, UK. According to web sources, tin oxide deposits (alluvial cassiterite) originally drew medieval miners to the area and eventually the tin streaming mine of Gonamena was established just upstream to the left of this shot. The extensive South Caradon mine shown, one of many in the area, was established by Captain James Clymo and his sons and the Kittow family after copper was discovered in 1834 from an adit driven into the hillside at Sump shaft. This became the deepest shaft of the mine sett at 250 fathoms (1,500 feet or 457m). The mine ran until the 1890s and produced some 218,000 tons of copper ore making it the 6th largest copper mine in Cornwall. Holman's Shaft pumping engine house can be seen on the skyline to the left adjacent to Rule's shaft engine houses ruins and chimney stacks. To the middle right is Jope's Shaft ivy clad pumping engine house and chimney (with lower boiler house in front) all above the massive waste material spoil heaps. It is thought that Jope's engine house housed one of the few Sims compound engines built in Cornwall. This shaft is also historically important as the site of the last 'man engine' to be built. In the foreground is the ore processing and dressing area. The ruined stamps engine house stack survives although the engine house is now rubble. It housed a steam engine of 28 inch diameter which powered a set of 24 headed stamps on the Southern side of the flywheel and a rotative crusher to the North). Cobbled dressing floors are also in the foreground. Ruins of the miner's dry and other ancillary buildings, leats, reservoirs and horse whim remains are also present. Some remains are buried beneath the massive spoil heaps from later workings. The northern ‘Main’ lode is marked by the ruins of Sump Shaft, Pearce’s Shaft, and Engine Shaft, which trace it up the steep hillside. The southern lode comprised lodes along the southern flank of the hill: Clymo’s, Jope’s, Kitford’s, Holman’s (all directors of the company) and Caunter Lode (a lode running at an offset angle to main lode). These are marked by ruins at Jope’s Shaft, Holman’s (where the archway over the tramline remains) and Kitto’s in the far east of the sett. The mines were serviced by the long dismantled Liskeard & Caradon Railway. This view was taken from a branch line of the old railway near the West Caradon Mine one October. The old granite setts (blocks) to hold the rails can still be seen in situ. Due to the importance of this site in the development of pioneering mining skills and technology which were exported around the whole world, the site is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Mining Landscape of Cornwall and West Devon no 1215.

Image dimensions: 4000 x 3000 pixels