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Richard Brookes
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HARTLAND POINT LIGHTHOUSE AND LUNDY ISLAND DEVON

Remote Hartland Point Lighthouse on the treacherous North Devon coast guided shipping safely from the open Atlantic Ocean into the Bristol Channel. Lundy Island (Norse for puffin) can be seen on the horizon and is a popular tourist destination and marine conservation area. The lighthouse, now a Grade II listed building, was designed by Sir James Douglass. Building commenced in November 1873 and it was opened in 1874 and automated in 1984. The tower is 18 m (59 ft) tall with the lamp being 37 m (121 ft) above mean sea level. On opening it was blessed by Frederick Temple, Bishop of Exeter, who later became Archbishop of Canterbury, and the light was lit for the first time by Lady Stucley of Hartland Abbey during the opening ceremony on 1 July 1874. it was protected by a 30 metres (98 ft) long sea wall which was built in 1925 to prevent erosion of the rocks on which it stands. The large concrete structures immediately to the south of the lighthouse were to provide the four keepers and their families with fresh water (their accommodation was also built on site but since demolished for a helipad). Electrified from 1924 and with improved optics the light had a range of 20 miles. However following a review the lighthouse was decommissioned in 2012 and put up for sale with a guide price of £500,000. Its light was replaced by a more economical LED beacon in front of the lighthouse with a range of 8 miles. Photo taken on the stunning South West Way coastal path, SW England, UK.

Image dimensions: 1958 x 1432 pixels

HARTLAND POINT ...

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HARTLAND POINT LIGHTHOUSE AND LUNDY ISLAND DEVON

Remote Hartland Point Lighthouse on the treacherous North Devon coast guided shipping safely from the open Atlantic Ocean into the Bristol Channel. Lundy Island (Norse for puffin) can be seen on the horizon and is a popular tourist destination and marine conservation area. The lighthouse, now a Grade II listed building, was designed by Sir James Douglass. Building commenced in November 1873 and it was opened in 1874 and automated in 1984. The tower is 18 m (59 ft) tall with the lamp being 37 m (121 ft) above mean sea level. On opening it was blessed by Frederick Temple, Bishop of Exeter, who later became Archbishop of Canterbury, and the light was lit for the first time by Lady Stucley of Hartland Abbey during the opening ceremony on 1 July 1874. it was protected by a 30 metres (98 ft) long sea wall which was built in 1925 to prevent erosion of the rocks on which it stands. The large concrete structures immediately to the south of the lighthouse were to provide the four keepers and their families with fresh water (their accommodation was also built on site but since demolished for a helipad). Electrified from 1924 and with improved optics the light had a range of 20 miles. However following a review the lighthouse was decommissioned in 2012 and put up for sale with a guide price of £500,000. Its light was replaced by a more economical LED beacon in front of the lighthouse with a range of 8 miles. Photo taken on the stunning South West Way coastal path, SW England, UK.

Image dimensions: 1958 x 1432 pixels